Why run?

If you could travel back to the 18th century and spend some time looking around, how often do you think you’d see someone out for a run?

If you think never, your thinking is the same as mine.

People in the 1700’s surely had more important things to do than run for thirty minutes, an hour, or whatever just to get some exercise. People likely stayed fit just living life.

Though I enjoy running, and I’ve been doing it a long time, sometimes I think it’s not a good use of time. I like to have a purpose for the things I do, and galloping through the neighborhood seems like a lot of effort that’s misdirected.

Though I started running in high school to compete on track and cross-country teams, racing is no longer my main reason for running. I like the health benefits, the pleasant physical feeling after running, and I’m in good shape to do other activities. Being part of the running club community here in Spokane, I’ve enjoyed the social aspect and meeting so many people the last few years. You’d think that’d be good enough reason to justify running.

I almost always stretch before runnning.

I almost always stretch before runnning.

Over the years, every so often I’ve wondered if I was squandering my time. I’ve wished I could find a way to have a simple lifestyle that gives me plenty of exercise and free time. I’d enjoy living in a community of like-minded people who are mutually dependent on the basic skills and products needed for everyday life, sort of like how life was before the industrial revolution. But how can you make that happen in this day and age?

I’ve read of intentional communities and religious orders that have many of the characteristics that appeal to me. However, nearly all have a religious component that is their raison d’etre, which doesn’t appeal to me.

I’m not sure many people share my preoccupation with trying to make exercise a by-product of everyday living. Perhaps one day I’ll figure out how I can make my dream lifestyle happen.

 

 

 

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